theparisreview:

The Webley Mk V of 2nd Lieutenant J.R.R. Tolkien.
According to the Imperial War Museum,

Tolkien was an Oxford University student in 1914 but was commissioned into the Lancashire Fusiliers soon after taking his degree in 1915. He joined the 11th Battalion of his regiment in France in June 1916, shortly before the Battle of the Somme. During the battle Tolkien served as the battalion signals officer. In late October 1916 he contracted trench fever and was sent back to England in early November. He spent most of the rest of the war convalescing. It was at this time that he began to write early versions of his Middle Earth stories. Debate continues regarding the extent to which Tolkien’s war experiences influenced his literary work.

theparisreview:

The Webley Mk V of 2nd Lieutenant J.R.R. Tolkien.

According to the Imperial War Museum,

Tolkien was an Oxford University student in 1914 but was commissioned into the Lancashire Fusiliers soon after taking his degree in 1915. He joined the 11th Battalion of his regiment in France in June 1916, shortly before the Battle of the Somme. During the battle Tolkien served as the battalion signals officer. In late October 1916 he contracted trench fever and was sent back to England in early November. He spent most of the rest of the war convalescing. It was at this time that he began to write early versions of his Middle Earth stories. Debate continues regarding the extent to which Tolkien’s war experiences influenced his literary work.

john-darnielles-bitter-melons:

zakuro-san:

kourtneyklaudiakarter:

I DIDN’T EVEN FULLY SEE THIS BEFORE I REBLOGGED IT. IT’S GREAT.

Oh, yes, yes, these leaves seem alright I’m just going to HAARRGRBLARGHRHAAAGRHRGHAHRARRGHGHGHHHH

EXPAND FUN

john-darnielles-bitter-melons:

zakuro-san:

kourtneyklaudiakarter:

I DIDN’T EVEN FULLY SEE THIS BEFORE I REBLOGGED IT. IT’S GREAT.

Oh, yes, yes, these leaves seem alright I’m just going to HAARRGRBLARGHRHAAAGRHRGHAHRARRGHGHGHHHH

EXPAND FUN

(via penguinsweaters)

I don’t know if some of you have been to these live reads at LACMA, where a classic film is read live on stage by actors who just sit and read the script. We did one recently of American Pie, but we reversed the gender roles. All the women played men; all the men played women. And it was so fascinating to be a part of this because, as the women took on these central roles — they had all the good lines, they had all the good laughs, all the great moments — the men who joined us to sit on stage started squirming rather uncomfortably and got really bored because they weren’t used to being the supporting cast.

It was fascinating to feel their discomfort [and] to discuss it with them afterward, when they said, “It’s boring to play the girl role!” And I said, “Yeah. Yeah. You think? Welcome to our world!

—Olivia Wilde crushing it when she talks about women in Hollywood.  (via leanin)

(via penguinsweaters)

parislemon:

Clever map by VinePair of the “Wines of Westeros”, just in time for tonight.

parislemon:

Clever map by VinePair of the “Wines of Westeros”, just in time for tonight.

falabaloo:

Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey (camouflage)  

(via scienceyoucanlove)

How My Teacher Helped Religious Parents Understand Evolution

discere-et-docere:

image

My biology teacher, Mr. G, used to teach at a K - 12 Christian school many years back, and in his biology class, he taught evolution. Naturally, this made many parents of religious families upset, and he expected quite a lot of backlash at parent-teacher night. Looking back, he laughs and says, “I knew they wanted a piece of me.”

So, to prepare, he bought regular 50 piece puzzles, and took a few pieces out from each of them. Then, when the parents arrived, he put them on the table, and requested the parents to construct the puzzles, without seeing the final picture on the box cover. By the time they eventually put all of the pieces they had together, he asked them, “What is it a picture of?”

They responded, “A flowerpot!” or, “A butterfly!” or, “A house!”

But then he told them, “But you don’t have all the pieces! How can you know!”

They said, “Well, we can see it!”

And he asked again, “You can’t see everything! How do you know for sure?”

They kept saying variations of, “Well, we don’t have all the pieces, but we know what it is, because they make up the shapes, and the lines to form the picture.” and, “It’s not complete, and we don’t know for sure, because we don’t have all of the pieces, but we know the image from the other pieces, and what it suggests the other pieces will be.”

And then, it soon dawned on them that this is how theories are formed, and how evolution is a worthwhile idea to understand and learn.

My teacher now says in class to his students, when we are learning about evolution, “It’s alright if you believe in something else, and it’s okay to keep those beliefs. We don’t want to attack you. But, in biology class, we want you to open your mind, and learn about evolution. Not believe in evolution initially, just understand it at first. We are not forcing you to believe something; this classroom should be a safe environment.”

Aristotle once said, "It is a mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."

All the scientific community asks the religious community to do is to consider our evidence and arguments. After you have properly understood all of it, and thought about how well it can apply to our world,  then you may go back to your beliefs if you are still not convinced. However, I am sure that it will open your mind, and help you understand our world a little better.

(via kammartinez)

Work finally begins when the fear of doing nothing exceeds the fear of doing it badly.

Alain de Botton, who knows a thing or two about doing what you love, quoted by Megan McArdle, author of The Up Side of Down: Why Failing Well Is the Key to Success

Pair with Debbie Millman’s indispensable Fail Safe

(via explore-blog)

I’ve carved the puppet, and I manipulate the strings, but while it’s on stage, the show belongs to the puppet.
Guy Davenport (via theparisreview)
culture, cookies, semicolons

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